2019 Reading – Books #66-70

This whole catching up thing is…not going great. But I’m trying?

#66: What I Like About Me by Jenna Guillaume

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: An Australian version of Dumplin‘ with more references to Dirty Dancing, basically.

Thoughts: I absolutely adored this. Maisie is a delightful character. I loved that it featured a lot of complicated friendships and how much it focused on body positivity. I loved Beamer, who’s kind of an asshat but also completely adorable. And I loved that it’s an Australian summer YA story because basically every summer YA book I’ve ever come across has been set in the US, and it was nice to see a summer Christmas on the page. It’s only about 200 pages, so it’s a very quick little read and I loved every second of it.

Rating: 5 stars

#67: Only Daughter by Anna Snoekstra

Audience: Adult
Genre:
 Thriller

Plot summary: Eleven years after teenage Bec disappeared, someone claiming to be her appears. Soon, the imposter is living Bec’s life, only to find that all is not as it seems.

Thoughts: This book was………it was fucking weird, my dudes. It’s set in Canberra, which I loved because it felt very familiar a lot of the time. But that aside, this 250 page book took me FOUR DAYS to read because I just didn’t give a shit. The first 200 pages was indescribably dull and then in the last 50 pages everything went batshit crazy and I just…????????? It made zero sense and I didn’t give a shit. I should have DNFed it, to be honest.

Rating: 2.5 stars

#68: Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter (Reread)

Audience: Adult
Genre: Thriller

Plot summary: When Claire’s husband is murdered, she reunites with her estranged sister to investigate some weird things she discovered at their house after his death.

Thoughts: I decided to reread this as a palate cleanser and I’m so glad I did. This book features trigger warnings for basically anything you can think of, but it’s SO GOOD. I loved the sister dynamic in the story and how much their relationship is at its core. I loved the characters. I loved the writing. I loved how even knowing the big plot twist that I was still hooked from start to finish. It’s incredibly gory and it honestly makes me worry about Karin Slaughter and the things her brain comes up with. But it’s SO. STINKING. GOOD.

Rating: 5 stars

#69: Catching Teller Crow by Ambelin and Ezekiel Kwaymullina

Audience: YA
Genre: Crime

Plot summary: Beth Teller is dead. Her father, a police officer, is the only person who can see her. Now, they have to work together to solve a mystery…

Thoughts: This book is tiny – barely 200 pages – and it’s a split narrative. Beth’s story is told in prose and Catching’s story is told in verse and has a very magical realism sort of a feel to it. I was honestly uncertain about this book until the big reveal near the end and then all of the pieces clicked into place at once and I realised just how clever it is and I loved that. Also, it’s a story by two Indigenous authors about two Indigenous protagonists, which YES.

Rating: 4 stars

#70: Jack of Hearts (and Other Parts) by Lev A.C. Rosen

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: A gay teenage boy starts writing a sex advice column and finds himself being stalked as a result.

Thoughts: I was super excited about reading this book because queer sex positivity is something that’s very much needed in YA. And the fact that it involved a mystery element was right up my alley. It’s a surprisingly funny book a lot of the time, and the columns that Jack writes are *chef’s kiss*.

However. I didn’t love Jack as a protagonist, to be perfectly honest. And I felt like the ending was really rushed. And frankly, there were many occasions when the police should have been involved and at every single one of those times, Jack would insist that the police not be involved and DUDE. STOP IT.

So yeah. I really wanted to love this one. But ultimately, it fell short for me. Sigh.

Rating: 3.75 stars

What have you been reading recently?

2019 Reading – Books #61-65

I am determined to catch up if it kills me… This one features a LOT of amazing covers, so let’s get stuck in!

#61: Saving Francesca by Melina Marchetta (Reread)

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Francesca is dealing with a new school, new friendships, and her mother’s depression. It’s shaping up to be one hell of a year.

Thoughts: I love this book a LOT. It’s such a compelling story full of wonderful characters. There are complicated friendships, complicated relationships, complicated family situations. It feels incredibly real and despite the fact that it’s barely 200 pages, I managed to utterly forget that it was a fictional story for the duration of the story.

Really, I reread this so that I can reread The Piper’s Son – a sort of sequel – so I can have all the characters fresh in my mind when The Place on Dalhousie comes out next month.

Rating: 5 stars

#62: Grave Mercy by Robin LaFevers (Reread)

Audience: YA?
Genre:
 Historical fiction

Plot summary: In fifteenth century Brittany, Ismae receives her first task as an assassin nun. Yeah. Seriously.

Thoughts: This series is so unique and now that there’s a sort of sequel to the original trilogy in Courting Darkness, it seemed appropriate to reread the original books. I really love this series, although I never quite know whether to consider them YA or adult books. The protagonists are in their late teens, but the love interests are all much older. The story is extremely political, which I really like, but it’s definitely not going to be everyone’s cup of tea. Still, I’m really enjoying being back in this world and I can’t wait to get to the new one!

Rating: 4 stars

#63: The Beauty That Remains by Ashley Woodfolk

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Three teenagers, all of whom have recently lost a loved one, deal with their grief in different ways, but are ultimately brought together by music.

Thoughts: This is the one and only book I got for Christmas, and I absolutely loved it. It’s a debut novel and it blew me away. The three characters all feel very individual, there’s masses of diversity in the story, and it’s beautifully written. As much as being a story about music, it’s a story about loss and the complicated emotions that come with grief. It’s a book I haven’t really heard anyone talking about before and I honestly would love to change that because this was heartbreaking and wonderful.

Rating: 4.25 stars

#64: Famous in a Small Town by Emma Mills 

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Over the course of one summer, a teenage girl, the new boy next door, and her friends try to track down the country music star who grew up in their town with the hopes of persuading her to perform in town and raise money for the marching band to attend a competition interstate.

Thoughts: The plot of this sounds absolutely bonkers when you write it out like that. But somehow, Emma Mills can make plots that sound bonkers into absolute delights. The characters are great, the supporting cast all felt fully fleshed out and I actually cared about them. There are precocious small children, complicated family situations, and summer love. Basically? It was generally delightful and I’m really glad I read it.

Rating: 4 stars

#65: Say Hello by Carly Findlay 

Audience: Adult
Genre: Nonfiction

Plot summary: Carly’s memoir discussing her life growing up with ichthyosis and becoming a disability advocate.

Thoughts: I always have a difficult time reviewing memoirs because it’s the story of someone’s life, you know? This was an eye-opening examination of life with a disability that’s largely unknown. Carly covers bullying, discrimination, the stares and judgement she receives just from walking down the street, the questions that people think it’s appropriate to ask her (usually related to sex). She also covers friendship, love, and how the internet and fandom were integral in giving her a sense of community. It was incredibly readable and I really, really enjoyed it even when the ableism she discusses filled me with rage.

Rating: 4 stars

What have you been reading recently?

January Book Haul

A mere six weeks late, but whatever…

I acquired a total of 18 books in January, and I’ve read 11 of them so far. Not a terrible start to the year!

THE STUFF I’VE READ

The Meg by Steve Alten
I was hoping that I’d love this as much as I love the movie. Unfortunately, while there were definitely moments about it that I loved, there was a lot of this that was just “giant shark eats whales and swims around and eats whales and swims around and eats whales”, which was a little disappointing. That said, I’m still kind of interested to read the next book in the series, so……..

The Ruins by Scott B. Smith
Oh man. I had such high hopes for this book. I mean, a horror story set on an archaeological dig in Mexico? Uh, YES. But this dragged on for way too long, was far more repetitive than I would have liked, and I gave zero fucks about any of the characters. I’ve heard how the movie version ends and that sounds MUCH creepier than the ending of the book.

99 Percent Mine by Sally Thorne
This has been a pretty unpopular one in the bookish community, but I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was fun and funny and Tom was an adorable cinnamon roll. Was it as good as The Hating Game? No. But it was still delightful.

Rough Terrain by Annabeth Albert
Definitely not my favourite in the Out of Uniform series, but this was still a sweet romance story with some delightful secondary characters.

The Stranger Beside Me by Anne Rule
I managed to read this the same week that the Ted Bundy show dropped on Netflix AND that we got the trailer for that awful looking Zac Efron movie. It’s a fascinating and horrifying story that gives a very unique perspective to Bundy.

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neal Hurston
An American classic that I’d never even heard of before last year. I think it’s one that would make for an easier reading experience on audio simply because of the way the dialogue is written, but on the whole this was a really great read and I’m so glad I picked it up.

A Thousand Sisters by Elizabeth Wein
This was an amazing nonfiction read about female fighter pilots in Russia during the Second World War. There were a lot of names thrown about and I definitely struggled to keep all the different girls straight in my head, but it was such an engaging and compelling story that I flew through it.

Famous in a Small Town by Emma Mills
My thoughts on this one will be in my next wrap up, but for now I’ll say that this was pretty stinking cute.

Scythe by Neal Shusterman
This kind of feels like cheating because I read it last year, but I bought this in hard copy during January because I loved it so much I wanted to have my own copy.

The Disasters by M.K. England
My first five star read of 2019 was one that I definitely needed to buy a hard copy of even though I already owned it on Kindle.

What If It’s Us by Becky Albertalli and Adam Silvera
A lot of people didn’t like this book, but I think I read it just at the right time (plus it’s full of Hamilton references), so I was more than willing to fork out for a hard copy as well.

THE STUFF I HAVE YET TO READ

Certain Dark Things by Silvia Moreno-Garcia
I really liked Signal to Noise by the same author when I read it a few years ago and given that this is a vampire story that involved Aztec elements and is set in Mexico City, I was sold almost instantly.

The Child Finder by Rene Denfeld
I’ve seen this one around a lot over the past year or so and I finally caved when I saw that it wasn’t very expensive on Kindle. I’m hoping it lives up to the hype!

No Exit by Taylor Adams
This was on a lot of people’s most anticipated lists for this year, which I find slightly baffling because it came out in Australia in 2017… Still, it was less than $2 so obviously I bought it. And the plot sounds intriguing, so…we’ll see.

Thunderhead by Neal Shusterman
Given that I loved the first book in the series enough to buy it in hard copy, it’s probably not surprising that I also bought the sequel in hard copy. I haven’t read it yet because I want to reread Scythe first.

Are We All Lemmings and Snowflakes? by Holly Bourne
I bought this intending to read it during Feminist Lit February but then I overloaded on Holly Bourne rereading the Spinster Club trilogy so…whoops? Hopefully I’ll get to it soon though!

Two Can Keep a Secret by Karen M. McManus
I’m really looking forward to this one because One of Us Is Lying was such a compelling mystery last year. But somehow I haven’t quite been able to bring myself to start this one yet. Sophomore book nerves, perhaps…

Lethal White by Robert Galbraith
I literally only bought this because I had a gift card and therefore didn’t have to pay the exorbitant sticker price. Otherwise I would have happily waited until it became available at the library.

What books have you acquired recently?

 

2019 Reading – Books #56-60

Not only have I failed miserably at this whole catching up thing, but I’m further behind than ever. GOOD JOB, GIRL. GOOD JOB.

#56: Navigating the Stars by Maria V. Snyder

Audience: YA
Genre: Sci-Fi

Plot summary: Mysterious things happen when Terracotta Warriors are found on other planets all over the galaxy.

Thoughts: I was indescribably excited when I heard about this book because, like, it’s archaeology in space which is 100% my jam. And the premise of this was SO interesting – the main character’s parents are archaeologists investigating the Terracotta Warriors on planets across the galaxy and dragging her away from her friends every time.

But unfortunately, I found this mostly dull. There was a very heavy emphasis on how space travel works, how time passes on other planets while you’re travelling, and how communication works between planets. And I just…didn’t give a shit. I found it somewhat repetitive at times, and basically I spent the duration wishing it was Unearthed by Amie Kaufman and Meagan Spooner and being incredibly sad when it wasn’t. The cover is stunning though?

Rating: 3 stars

#57: The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed

Audience: YA
Genre:
 Contemporary

Plot summary: Three unlikely girls band together to get justice for a girl who was raped at their school the previous year and whose family was basically run out of town as a result.

Thoughts: I love this book a lot. Like, a LOT. The three protagonists are such strong and individual characters. It’s a very difficult book to read, given how much it deals with rape and rape culture, but it’s amazing from start to finish. It’s diverse and heartbreaking and beautifully told. It was my best book of 2018 and I was thrilled to discover that it stands up on reread just as well. Seriously, though. Read this book.

Rating: 5 stars

#58: The Dead Girls of Hysteria Hall by Katie Alender

Audience: YA
Genre: Paranormal/Horror

Plot summary: Delia has just inherited a house from her great-aunt. Except turns out it’s a former psychiatric hospital. And it’s hella haunted.

Thoughts: I picked this up on a whim and it turned out to be far more ghost story than horror story, which I found a little disappointing. It definitely had some twists and turns that I didn’t see coming, but other than that it was just sort of…fine? There was nothing bad about it, there was nothing great about it. The ending was…peculiar and not at all what I expected it to be. But I’ve read many worse things. So.

Rating: 3 stars

#59: Not That I Could Tell by Jessica Strawser

Audience: Adult
Genre: Thriller

Plot summary: After a woman and her two young children disappear, the women of the neighbourhood try to discover whether her husband is involved.

Thoughts: Another disappointing thriller that I picked up from the library. Again, there was nothing wrong with it. It was just sort of aggressively middle of the road and I just didn’t really care about the characters or the writing or the story that was being told. And honestly, I’ve already forgotten the vast majority of what happened. So I went in hoping it would be like Big Little Lies, but came away pretty disappointed.

Rating: 3 stars

#60: A Blade So Black by L.L. McKinney

Audience: YA
Genre: Paranormal

Plot summary: On the night her father dies, Alice sees a monster. Thus begins her journey into Wonderland as a Dreamwalker.

Thoughts: This has been described as Alice in Wonderland meets Buffy, and that’s pretty much exactly what I got. The Wonderland here is very VERY different to Carroll’s original, but it worked well. The characters were solid, the action scenes were great, and I liked the writing.

What let this down for me was Alice’s every day life. While it was great that her mother was so present in the story (the complete opposite of Buffy, tbh), the constant “YOU ARE NOT HOME WHEN YOU SAID YOU WOULD BE HOME, YOU ARE GROUNDED” started to feel repetitive very quickly.

Thankfully, the last 50+ pages were a wild ride and were definitely enough to have me bumping it up an extra half star. And now I’m very interested to see what happens in the sequel later this year!!

Rating: 3.5 stars

What have you been reading recently?

2019 Reading – Books #51-55

I am determined to catch up this week so that I can actually write posts about something else at SOME POINT THIS YEAR OMFG.

#51: …And a Happy New Year? by Holly Bourne

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: A year after the series, the Spinster Club reunites on New Year’s Eve.

Thoughts: This was my first time reading this relatively short epilogue to the trilogy, and I……had really mixed feelings about it. The girls have gone their separate ways after school, and their relationships have changed. I found Lottie utterly exhausting and moderately awful in this book. I mean, I understand why she was the way she was, but duuuuuuuude. Chill.

Basically, I wanted more of this that was like the last few chapters and way less like the division that’s evident between them in the previous, like, 80% of the book. Sigh. (The cover is amazing though)

Rating: 3.5 stars

#52: Imposter by Susanne Winnacker

Audience: YA
Genre:
 Sci-Fi/Crime

Plot summary: Tessa can absorb the DNA of others and turn herself into them. She’s also part of a secret branch of the FBI, and they’ve tasked her with her first case – turning herself into a murder victim to try and catch the murderer.

Thoughts: This was a very fast paced story which was kind of like a cross between X-Men and Veronica Mars. The murder investigation side of things was pretty solid and I definitely didn’t guess who was responsible. But at the same time, a LOT of the story here focused on Tessa’s feelings for her best friend, even though he has a girlfriend. So I could happily have done without all of that…

Rating: 3 stars

#53: The Geography of Lost Things by Jessica Brody

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Ali’s estranged father has just died and left her his classic car. In desperate need of money, she decides to sell it. There’s only one problem: she can’t drive a manual. But her ex-boyfriend can…

Thoughts: I absolutely loved the concept of this. I’m a sucker for roadtrip stories, and when it’s one that features exes trapped in a car together (and basically destined to overcome their problems and get back together again), I was instantly sold. And for the most part, I thoroughly enjoyed this and how it looked at the concept trading up from something essentially worthless to something worth thousands.

But at the same time, I struggled with how much of the story could have happened MUCH sooner if only Ali and Nico had USED THEIR FREAKING WORDS. So…it was fine? But I’ll probably forget basically everything about it in a matter of weeks.

Rating: 3.5 stars

#54: When We Were Friends by Tina Seskis

Audience: Adult
Genre: Thriller?

Plot summary: A group of university friends meet 25 years later for a reunion. A bunch of secrets come out, and their numbers are reduced by one as a result.

Thoughts: I DNFed this one about 150 pages in because I was a) confused and b) bored af. There were simply too many characters in this. There were six women in the friendship group, and each of them had a perspective. But not only that, it cut between the past and the present and varying times in the past. So there were basically TWELVE perspectives (possibly more??) in the story and I just. didn’t. care. Which is very sad, because I LOVED Tina Seskis’ The Honeymoon last year. Sigh.

Rating: DNF

#55: Naked in Death by J.D. Robb

Audience: Adult
Genre: Crime

Plot summary: Lieutenant Eve Dallas finds herself rubbing shoulders with New York’s elite when she investigates the murder of a sex worker.

Thoughts: Unpopular opinion incoming, friends: I hated this book. I hated it so fucking much. So here’s the thing: I read and loved this series back in undergrad, but I read it completely out of order, grabbing whichever book was available from my local library. And that was mostly the newer books in the series.

This is the first book, which was written in 1995. And ooooh boy, does it show. Despite being set in 2058, this is ridiculously dated in terms of attitudes, sex scenes and technology. Roarke, who everyone swoons over, is a controlling asshat who repeatedly lets himself into Eve’s apartment because he owns the building. She says no repeatedly during the sex scenes and he keeps going anyway until she starts moaning and then it’s all good because she’s enjoying herself, right? WRONG WRONG WRONGITY WRONG.

Add in the fact that the way the mystery wrapped up was a clusterfuck of awfulness and I’m honestly really mad that I spend $11.99 on this book. At least I didn’t buy the whole 50-ish book series at once???

Rating: 1 star

What have you been reading recently?

2019 Reading – Books #46-50

I’ve just finished book 63, so this five book thing is going GREAT. Also I have a stack of other posts I want to write, but I feel like I never have time to write them because I’m stressed about being behind on wrap ups… BRAINS ARE FUN!!

#46: How Hard Can Love Be? by Holly Bourne (Reread)

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Amber travels to the US to see her mother for the first time in two years and instead finds herself mostly volunteering at the summer camp her mother’s boyfriend runs.

Thoughts: This is the second book in the Spinster Club trilogy, and while this has always been my least favourite book of the three, it’s still a really great read. The characters are fantastic, the friendships are amazing, and the feminism that flows through the story is A+. Amber is an incredibly angry character, but given the way her life is going, it’s totally understandable. Also, it really made me want to go hiking, which is a pretty impressive feat because I fucking hate hiking.

Rating: 4 stars

#47: On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Audience: YA
Genre:
 Contemporary

Plot summary: Bri desperately wants to follow in her dead father’s footsteps and be a rapper, and her determination intensifies when her family’s poverty gets even worse…

Thoughts: I was veeeeeeeeery nervous going into this book – would Angie Thomas be able to write another book as great as The Hate U Give? Would I be interested in Bri’s story when it revolved so much around hip hop, which is basically the exact opposite of my basic bitch taste in music? Would it be as hard hitting as THUG was? Thankfully, the answer was yes on all counts. Bri is a fantastic character, and I flew through it.

That being said, it’s a far more bleak story than THUG. Yes, THUG deals with a lot of serious topics, but there’s a solid amount of humour in the story, and in contrast, On the Come Up…doesn’t have that. And it’s not a bad thing that it doesn’t have that, it’s just…different. Obviously, I am very much not the intended audience for this book, so take everything I say with many grains of salt. But despite how bleak it was, I loved every second of it.

Rating: 5 stars

#48: What’s a Girl Gotta Do? by Holly Bourne (Reread)

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Lottie is staring down the barrel of a Cambridge interview when she decides to undertake a project calling out every example of sexism and misogyny she sees for an entire month.

Thoughts: When I first read the Spinster Club trilogy, this was my favourite book of the three. But on reread, being in Lottie’s head for over 400 pages is…difficult. She becomes pretty self-destructive in her quest to point out sexism, and she’s very forceful in her attitudes a lot of the time. And honestly, it became exhausting after a while. But all of those nitpicks aside, this is still a great story full of wonderful friendships and plenty of feminism.

Rating: 4.5 stars

#49: Hunger by Roxane Gay

Audience: Adult
Genre: NonFiction

Plot summary: Roxane Gay’s biography about her relationship with her body following her gang rape at the age of twelve.

Thoughts: Oof. This one, unsurprisingly, was a very difficult read. It deals extensively with rape and rape culture, as well as body image, fat shaming and fat phobia in modern society. It’s an incredibly personal book and it’s in no way an easy book to read. But there were so many amazingly relatable moments in it, and I’m really glad I read it.

Rating: 4 stars

#50: Watcher in the Woods by Kelley Armstrong

Audience: Adult
Genre: Thriller

Plot summary: The fourth book in the Rockton series features Casey dealing with the arrival of a US Marshal who’s looking for one of the residents…

Thoughts: I absolutely LOVE this series, which is set in a secret community in the depths of the Yukon where people can hide out from their pasts. This one was no exception. The characters are wonderful, the mystery was full of twists and turns, and the addition of Casey’s sister to the story added an extra layer of complexity. Also, puppies. What more could you want?!

Rating: 4 stars

What have you been reading recently?

2019 Reading – Books #41-45

Well, so much for my theory that five book wrap ups would keep me on track better than weekly wrap ups. I’m now up to book 55, so I’m getting more and more behind with every passing day…

#41: Shrill by Lindy West

Audience: Adult
Genre: NonFiction

Plot summary: A series of essays about feminism.

Thoughts: I absolutely adored this. West’s writing is fantastic and full of moments that were both relatable and utterly hilarious. She discusses issues like abortion in a very matter-of-fact way, and basically every single essay in this book was fantastic from start to finish. And her discussion of periods? *chef’s kiss*

Rating: 5 stars

#42: Beauty Queens by Libba Bray (Reread)

Audience: YA
Genre:
 Contemporary

Plot summary: A plane full of beauty queens crash lands on a mysterious desert island where the girls must fight for survival.

Thoughts: This book is indescribably satirical and I love absolutely everything about it. There’s so much diversity in the characters – there are POC characters, LGBTQIA+ characters, and characters with disabilities. It’s like a cross between Lost and Lord of the Flies and it’s hilarious throughout. The characters are fantastic, the writing is fantastic, and the fact that it has commercial breaks cracks me up.

Rating: 5 stars

#43: Queens of Geek by Jen Wilde (Reread)

Audience: YA
Genre: Contemporary

Plot summary: Three best friends from Melbourne travel to LA for a convention where they overcome personal obstacles and fall in love.

Thoughts: I adore this book. It’s quite short but you never feel like you’re being short changed on who the characters are. It’s told in two perspectives – Chinese-Australian bisexual Charlie and autistic plus-sized Taylor – and both of them are absolute delights. I love both of their stories, although I think I love Taylor just that little bit more because she’s just an ordinary girl attending a convention where Charlie is attending as the star of a recent cult zombie movie. It’s sweet and swoony and I love it.

Rating: 5 stars

#44: A Thousand Sisters by Elizabeth Wein

Audience: YA
Genre: NonFiction

Plot summary: The story of the one thousand women who made up three battalions of fighter pilots and support staff in the USSR during World War II.

Thoughts: I’ve been fascinated by The Night Witches for YEARS so when I found out that Elizabeth Wein of Code Name Verity fame had a nonfiction book coming out about The Night Witches, I was frighteningly excited. And this did NOT disappoint. The stories of these women are utterly compelling. They flew missions in incredibly difficult conditions with many of their superiors doubting their abilities, and they did so in men’s uniforms – right down to the boots and underwear – because no one thought to make uniforms in their sizes. Wein’s passion for flying shines throughout and she did a fantastic job of telling the story of these incredible women.

Rating: 4 stars

#45: The Broken Girls by Simone St. James

Audience: Adult
Genre: Thriller

Plot summary: When a woman discovers that the boarding school where her sister was murdered is about to be reopened, she’s determined to find out who’s behind it and ends up uncovering a 50 year old murder.

Thoughts: I was somewhat hesitant going into this, because it turns out it had some serious ghost-y elements in it, which I’m not a huge fan of in a standard thriller. But I loved the fact that the protagonist is an investigative journalist – it gave us a protagonist who’s untrained in police procedure but who still had the skills to plausibly get to the bottom of things – and I really enjoyed the fact that it jumped between the past and the present constantly. I’m still not entirely sure what the purpose of the ghost-y elements was, to be honest, but I’m glad I gave this a shot.

Rating: 4 stars

What have you been reading recently?